Politics

Twitter again flags Trump tweet about voting in North Carolina

Twitter again flagged a tweet from President Trump in which he urged voters to show up at polling sites in North Carolina this election cycle to ensure that their mail-in votes are counted.

The label was just the latest of several instances in which social media companies have stepped in to correct the record on Trump’s scattershot remarks on the election that have, at times, said the race will be “rigged” and that mail-in voting is particularly susceptible to fraud.

“NORTH CAROLINA: To make sure your Ballot COUNTS, sign & send it in EARLY. When Polls open, go to your Polling Place to see if it was COUNTED. IF NOT, VOTE! Your signed Ballot will not count because your vote has been posted. Don’t let them illegally take your vote away from you!” Trump said in his tweet.

Trump’s remarks appeared more straightforward than past comments in which he encouraged supporters in North Carolina to actually vote twice — once by mail and once in person — in order to test the integrity of the system.

Still, Twitter said it was flagging the post “for violating our Civic Integrity Policy, specifically for encouraging people to potentially vote twice.”

“To protect people on Twitter, we err on the side of limiting the circulation of Tweets which advise people to take actions which could be illegal in the context of voting or result in the invalidation of their votes,” Twitter said in a post on its @TwitterSafety page.

Twitter said the tweet will remain on the website but that engagements with it will be limited, allowing users to quote-tweet it but not like, reply to or retweet the post.

Saturday is not the first time social media companies have said they would tackle Trump’s comments on voting since he suggested in a local interview in North Carolina that people should vote twice, which is illegal.

Facebook announced it would take down videos of the interview if the posts did not “correct the record” on voter fraud.

Twitter also slapped the same warning on a tweet last month saying mail drop boxes used for the upcoming election could lead to fraud.

Twitter’s policies note the company considers tweets to be in the public interest if they directly contribute to “understanding or discussion of a matter of public concern.” The public interest exemption applies only to elected government officials.